RD400 and other 2 stroke motorcycles

Mostly vintage two stroke bikes

Jan 14

KH400 flywheel removal

My 1976 Kawasaki KH400 is lacking in the charging department. I’m planning to send the stator coils to a shop for rewinding, hopefully that will get the battery charging back where it should be.

The stator coils and CDI are behind the flywheel on the left side of the motor.  To get the flywheel off, first remove the small bolt holding it on then use a flywheel puller.  The flywheel puller can be a 16mm x 1.5 bolt or the rear axle off a KH400.

I tried the bolt and the flywheel wouldn’t budge.  Not wanting to remove the exhaust pipes to get the rear axle, I found a KZ1000 front axle with the correct thread size/pitch.  The flywheel still wouldn’t budge.  

Some guys put a small grade 8 bolt in the hole, then put the flywheel puller on.  The small bolt should  push on the crank and pop the flywheel off.  My first try, the bolt bent and got stuck.  I fished it out, went to the hardware store and found a grade 8 then tried again.  Still it wouldn’t come out and I was a little worried about mashing up the threads in the hole.  Then I found the answer!

Pack the hole with grease, then thread the puller on and tighten.  Grease, like brake fluid is not compressible.  Tightening up on the puller, some grease will ooze out through the keyway and around the threads.  Then eventually “pop” the flywheel comes off.  

Note - the crank must be still while you do this, if the motor is in neutral the crank will just turn while you’re trying to tighten.  So put the motor in gear then jam something in between the chain and sprocket.  I used an old washcloth wrapped around a 1 inch pipe.

Make sure not to drop the flywheel on the ground, it’s delicate.

image


Oct 28
Here’s my latest RD400 project.  It’s a 1977 model, bought from an old friend who used to have a collection of RD’s.  He left this one in a cycle shop to have some minor work done by his mechanic friend.  The mechanic got fired and the bike sat for about six years.  Finally, the shop said take the bike or it will be disposed.  
My friend lost the title, which he had never transferred into his name.  I bought the bike for a good price considering no title.  After nearly a year I managed to get it titled.  
There’s one motorcycle project I have ahead of this one (1973 H1 Kawasaki).  So far I’ve picked up a rebuilt crank and Spec2 expansion chambers.  The plan is to repaint the frame, rebuild the motor and fix up everything else that needs fixing up.  The gas tank, top end, seat etc. are sitting around in boxes.
Stay tuned!

Here’s my latest RD400 project.  It’s a 1977 model, bought from an old friend who used to have a collection of RD’s.  He left this one in a cycle shop to have some minor work done by his mechanic friend.  The mechanic got fired and the bike sat for about six years.  Finally, the shop said take the bike or it will be disposed.  

My friend lost the title, which he had never transferred into his name.  I bought the bike for a good price considering no title.  After nearly a year I managed to get it titled.  

There’s one motorcycle project I have ahead of this one (1973 H1 Kawasaki).  So far I’ve picked up a rebuilt crank and Spec2 expansion chambers.  The plan is to repaint the frame, rebuild the motor and fix up everything else that needs fixing up.  The gas tank, top end, seat etc. are sitting around in boxes.

Stay tuned!


Sep 13

Finally an update to the RD400 website

I owned the pictured 1978 RD400E and 1979 RD400F in the early 2000’s and sold them both to the same guy.  The Daytona went first around 2004 and then I sold him the RD400E in 2005.  I had blown both of the bikes’ motors.  After rebuilding the motors and many hours of tinkering, I gave up on having a reliable RD400 for island cruising. 

In 2012 I bought an RZ350 and loved it!  Fast and reliable, making me want to tackle the RD400 motor again.

At present I own several 2-stroke motorcycles, including an RD400 basket case. I’ll try and post regularly to show the progress of the builds.